11 million

Gavi support had contributed to immunising 11 million children against pneumococcal disease by the end of 2013.

Source: WHO/UNICEF

70%

70% of cervical cancer cases can be prevented with human papillomavirus vaccines. One woman dies from cervical cancer every two minutes - or 275,000 a year - over 85% in the developing world.

Source: WHO

22 million

Nearly 22 million [21.8 million] infants remain underimmunised in the world each year.

Source: WHO/UNICEF

1.5 million

In 2012, approximately 6.6 million children died before the age of five. WHO estimates that 1.5 million of these deaths are due to vaccine-preventable diseases.

Source: WHO

+40%

Over the course of a decade, the weighted average price of pentavalent vaccine (DTP-hepB-Hib) dropped by 43% from US$ 3.56 per dose in 2003 to US$ 2.04 per dose in 2013, with a lowest-ever price of US$ 1.19 from one supplier in 2013.

Source: Gavi

US$ 8.7 billion

By the end of June 2014, the Vaccine Alliance had committed US$ 8.7 billion in programme support until 2017 to the world’s poorest countries.

Source: Gavi

440 million

Since 2000, 440 million children have been immunised through Gavi support to routine immunisation in the world's poorest countries.

Source: WHO/UNICEF

24%

In total, 24% of children in Gavi-supported countries are undervaccinated.

Source: WHO/UNICEF

6 million

Approximately six million future deaths averted from hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type B, measles, pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio, rotavirus diarrhoea and yellow fever since Gavi's launch in 2000.

Source: Gavi/Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

73 countries

Gavi support is available to the 73 poorest countries in the world. By the end of 2013, 22 countries were projected to graduate from Gavi’s support by 2020.

Source: Gavi

+150 million

By the end of 2013, 11 countries in the African meningitis belt had collectively immunised 153 million people against meningitis A with support from the Vaccine Alliance.

Source: WHO/UNICEF

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